Artist Series – What Do You See, Old Apple Tree? 26th January 2019

£25.00

This is a short and fun pin hole camera course based on Derek Mans highly successful personal project ‘What Do You See, Old Apple Tree?’ – Winner, Excellent Award, Canon New Cosmos of Photography 2018.

During your visit you’ll be making pin hole cameras from apples!…. Then getting out onto the streets to take photographs. The course will last  1.5 hours and in that time you’ll develop and print your best image.

15% of all tickets sold will go to The Orchard Project – The Orchard Project is the only national charity dedicated solely to the creation, restoration and celebration of community orchards. We aim to make a serious contribution to a better food system, based on people working together where they live to produce and harvest their own fruit.

Man was nominated for the Magnum Photos Graduate Photographers Award. His work are in the collection of Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool (UK) and Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts (Japan).

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Description

The course will run from 11am – 5pm on Saturday 26th of January 2019

Schedule:

Pick your slot: 11am / 12.30pm / 2pm / 3.30pm (let us know what time you would like when you book)

What we will cover:

There will be a brief artists talk about the project and method of making the camera followed by shooting with a pin hole, developing and printing your image.

Level of experience:

This is for everyone, no experience required.

What we provide:

We provide all the chemistry, paper…and apples!

Where will the course take place and how many people will attend:

The course will take place in the Bright Rooms with a maximum of 6 people attending.

About Derek Man and his project ‘What Do You See, Old Apple Tree’

The work sets out to capture the relationship between restored orchards in and around London and the people who support them.

These orchards are in huge decline. Since the 1950s, England has lost half of its traditional orchards with only a third of the eating apples sold in the UK being home-grown. In London the problem is even greater, with a decline of 98% in the last century. These facts are very symptomatic of a society that has over time been driven away from nature in exchange for economic growth.

In the fast changing city, there are some who still find it crucial to give the inhabitants a link to nature, such as volunteer Tony, who said that,

“The best thing about having an orchard is the opportunity for our inner city children to have an understanding of how things grow and ultimately to see and eat the fruit. This is especially important as many of our children do not have a garden.”

Working in collaboration with the national charity The Orchard Project, I visited sites under restoration and created pinhole cameras out of apples at each location.

Utilising these site-specific cameras, the work captures team members, volunteers and visitors, who are all integral to the survival of the orchards. By piecing together a narrative from the perspective of the preserved apple, the project seeks to highlight and reflect on the intertwined relationship between agriculture and community.

Derek Man

Derek Man is a photographer based in London. Born and raised in Hong Kong, he has lived in the UK since 2005 and became a naturalised citizen in 2016. His work explores cultural identity and sense of community – how we form a sense of place, and what makes us feel like we belong.

His latest project What Do You See, Old Apple Tree?  focuses on the dwindling number of apple orchards around London. It was featured on BBC In-Pictures and has won the Excellent Award in the Canon New Cosmos of Photography competition.

Man’s project The Isle of Wight Analogy explores the Britishness that lingers on the island as a way to come to understand his new adopted country. It was selected by Tate curator Shoair Mavlian for Source Graduate Photography and by Eikoh Hosoe for K*MoPA Young Portfolio. His work Close to Home looks at the housing crisis in Hong Kong. Commissioned by Open Eye Gallery, it was showcased at LOOK/17 Liverpool International Photography Festival in 2017.

Man was nominated for the Magnum Photos Graduate Photographers Award. His work are in the collection of Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool (UK) and Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts (Japan).

The work sets out to capture the relationship between restored orchards in and around London and the people who support them.

These orchards are in huge decline. Since the 1950s, England has lost half of its traditional orchards with only a third of the eating apples sold in the UK being home-grown. In London the problem is even greater, with a decline of 98% in the last century. These facts are very symptomatic of a society that has over time been driven away from nature in exchange for economic growth.

In the fast changing city, there are some who still find it crucial to give the inhabitants a link to nature, such as volunteer Tony, who said that,

“The best thing about having an orchard is the opportunity for our inner city children to have an understanding of how things grow and ultimately to see and eat the fruit. This is especially important as many of our children do not have a garden.”

Working in collaboration with the national charity The Orchard Project, I visited sites under restoration and created pinhole cameras out of apples at each location.

Utilising these site-specific cameras, the work captures team members, volunteers and visitors, who are all integral to the survival of the orchards. By piecing together a narrative from the perspective of the preserved apple, the project seeks to highlight and reflect on the intertwined relationship between agriculture and community.

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